Are you having trouble obtaining your Social Security benefits for blindness or other significant disabilities? Georgia residents are not alone. The story of how one blind Atlanta man finally got his SSD money is both heart-breaking and inspiring for those who may have lost hope about their eligibility for this government program.

The man, who is legally blind, spent more than a year attempting to access his Social Security benefits. He hired an attorney, looked over the paperwork and checked everything for accuracy. Still, he waited for months on end. Finally, the man became desperate because his savings was running out, and he was facing foreclosure on his family home.

The Social Security Administration had the man’s paperwork, but it was lost in the shuffle of government approval. When a local news station found out that the man’s benefits had not been processed in a 12-month time frame, reporters took action. The news crew got the man his benefits activated in 24 hours.

The man is thankful to the community that helped him regain his financial independence, and he does not seem to hold any animosity against the Social Security Administration. He says the approval has come as a huge relief. Even though he acknowledges that the administration should have processed his paperwork faster, the man says he is just happy to have enough money to keep his home.

Stories like these are not unusual in Georgia and elsewhere in America. Social Security paperwork is confusing, tedious and uncertain, and many people who deserve benefits never get them. Unqualified attorneys and poorly educated assistants further prey on people who desperately need the money allotted to them by government leaders. Sometimes, SSD beneficiaries are having difficulty getting their money, but they just do not know where to turn. If you are in that situation, recruiting the help of a knowledgeable attorney can mean the difference between just getting by and getting you the help you deserve.

Source: 11Alive, “Man gets disability benefits in one day, after waiting a year,” Bill Liss, June 28, 2012.