One year ago, people all across Atlanta watched or read the news that two bombs exploded on the route where thousands of people from around the world were running in the Boston Marathon. The event was undoubtedly tragic and hundreds of people were seriously injured. 

Now, a year later, many of the victims are still recovering from some of the devastating injuries they suffered as a result of the explosions. While some have been able to make enough progress that they have returned to work or their everyday lives, others continue to struggle with long-term or permanent injuries that make it impossible to fully recover from the devastating event.

Among those most seriously injured were the victims who lost a limb in the explosion. People have had to get prosthetic legs or arms, requiring them to relearn many things like how to walk, write and care for themselves again. The struggle that many of these people face on a daily basis cannot be overestimated.

There were also other physical injuries suffered by victims of the bombing. People near the explosions lost full or partial hearing, broke bones, suffered serious burns and experienced nerve damage. Depending on the extent of these injuries, victims may require ongoing care and multiple surgeries; many of them may never fully recover.

Mental injuries have also been widely reported by victims at the marathon. That type of catastrophe can disrupt a person’s psychological well-being. One of the most common mental conditions that people experience after this type of tragedy is post-traumatic stress disorder. There may also be people struggling with depression, anxiety or even agoraphobia, which can cause a person to avoid or be fearful of public places.

People who were affected by the Boston Marathon bombing experienced something that will likely change their lives forever. Hopefully, however, they can get the help and support they need to deal with the physical and mental injuries suffered in the attacks. 

Source: The Boston Globe, “A year since Marathon attacks, many of wounded struggle,” Kay Lazar and Sarah Schweitzer, April 15, 2014