People seeking disability benefits often think their conditions qualify as disabled. The truth is, several factors can result in the denial of your claim, even if your condition prevents you from working. First, if your condition will not last 12 months or result in death, it cannot qualify as a disabling condition for you to receive benefits. According to Disability Benefits Help, you also cannot receive benefits if your condition is not considered severe enough. 

Second, unless you fall into one of the several exceptions, your claim may be denied if you do not comply with the treatment recommended by your doctor. The department uses your medical examiner’s evaluation to determine whether or not you are responding to medication. If you have a genuine situation that is preventing you from following the predetermined treatment procedure, you may present it at the appeals hearing. However, you should always work with your doctor and find an agreeable solution. 

Accessibility is another reason for claim denial. If the subsequent administration cannot contact you, your claim may be evaluated without the necessary information. The fourth cause of claim denial is failure to cooperate. Choosing not to release your medical records could hurt your claim. 

The department may look into your personal lifestyle and try to find habits that they may use against you. For example, if alcoholism or illegal drug use contributes to your disability, you typically cannot receive benefits. However, you may be eligible if you would be considered disabled after stopping the use of these substances. It may be possible to lower the risk of claim denial based on common mistakes.